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Thursday, October 31
 

12:00pm

Pre-conference Lecture at Emmanuel College, U of T
Dr. Hanan Alexander will be speaking at Emmanuel College in Victoria University at the University of Toronto.

His lecture, entitled "A Kingdom of Priests and a Holy Nation: Religion and Education in the Public Square" will take place from noon to 2 pm, and includes a complementary lunch. If you plan to attend, you must choose this session at Sched (which means you must already have created a log-in for Sched -- details here: https://religiouseducation.net/help/sched) and you must do so by October 5th, which is the deadline for the meal count.

Speakers
avatar for Hanan Alexander

Hanan Alexander

Dean of the Faculty of Education and Professor of Philosophy of Education, Program Chair and President-elect of REA, University of Haifa
Hanan Alexander is Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Haifa, where he serves as Professor of Philosophy of Education and chairs the executive board of the Center for Jewish Education. He has taught at American Jewish University, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Graduate Theological... Read More →


Thursday October 31, 2019 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Emmanuel College

2:00pm

Pre-conference Walking Tours
Walking tours of the University of Toronto and surrounding area, option to stop for dinner,

Speakers
MG

Marie Green

University of St. Michael's College
EK

Eser Kim

Ph.D. Student, Knox College, University of Toronto


Thursday October 31, 2019 2:00pm - 6:00pm
TBA

5:30pm

ALLLM Opening Forum: Where Help and Harm Collide, Responding to the Opiate Crisis in Toronto
“People will die if Doug Ford's government doesn't reverse its decision to stop funding some safe injection sites,” said Toronto's Medical Officer of Health on Monday, but [Ontario Premier Doug Ford] said he also has to listen to residents who don't want the sites in their "backyard."
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation,  April 1, 2019

The Association of Leaders in Lifelong Learning for Ministry (ALLLM) invite you to a forum on Thursday October 31, 2019 to consider the impact of the opiate crisis on the City of Toronto, to reflect on the ethics of harm reduction, and to consider ways that people of faith might respond.

ALLLM is assembling a panel including Paulos Gebreyesus, Executive Director of the Regent Park Community Health Centre, and frontline church outreach workers who are responding in practical and pragmatic ways to a crisis which is exploding so quickly that it’s diverting resources and energy away from other longer term programming in their agencies. We’ll invite them to engage us in a discussion about:
  • The extent and impact of the opiate crisis on Toronto’s population.
  • The social and political debate in Ontario over whether supervised injection sites are an appropriate and necessary way to save lives, or an abdication of social responsibility.
  • The ethics of harm reduction, and its connection to principles of social justice that are rooted in our religious traditions.
  • The practical and ethical concerns that need to be addressed even by those who are convinced that strategies such as supervised injection sites are morally justifiable and an appropriate use of public dollars.
On Friday morning, come to a follow-up workshop to discuss how post-degree professional development and learning can support and encourage ministry leaders of faith communities to lead theologically and practically within their shifting contexts, using the Toronto Opiate Crisis as a case study for education into faith and the common good.

$15 for refreshments collected during registration or at the door.

Thursday October 31, 2019 5:30pm - 7:00pm
MacKenzie Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

6:30pm

REA Board Meeting
Board meeting for the REA.

Thursday October 31, 2019 6:30pm - 9:00pm
St. Laurent Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale
  • Setup Boardroom
 
Friday, November 1
 

7:30am

Muslim Prayer (all welcome)
Everyone welcome! Past president Dr. Mualla Selçuk will lead us in a meditation on the 99 names of God within Muslim faith, and invite people into a collaborative sharing of experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Mualla Selçuk

Mualla Selçuk

Professor, Ankara University
Prof. Dr. Mualla Selçuk graduated from Ankara University School of Divinity with a B.Sc. degree. She was appointed as a research assistant in the same school and later granted a Ph.D. following the dissertation of her doctoral thesis called "Religious Patterns in the Education of... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 7:30am - 8:00am
Algonquin D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00am

Registration
Friday November 1, 2019 8:00am - 3:00pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:30am

Opening Plenary: KAIROS Blanket Exercise
The conference will open with the KAIROS Blanket Exercise, a unique participatory history lesson, developed in collaboration with Indigenous Elders, knowledge keepers, and educators, that fosters truth, understanding, respect and reconciliation among Indigenous and non-indigenous peoples. This session promises to be especially meaningful given some of the brave but difficult conversations many of us experienced surrounding issues of race in our association and in our societies at last year’s REA annual meeting in Washington DC.

Speakers
avatar for Hanan Alexander

Hanan Alexander

Dean of the Faculty of Education and Professor of Philosophy of Education, Program Chair and President-elect of REA, University of Haifa
Hanan Alexander is Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Haifa, where he serves as Professor of Philosophy of Education and chairs the executive board of the Center for Jewish Education. He has taught at American Jewish University, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Graduate Theological... Read More →
avatar for Mim Harder

Mim Harder

KAIROS


Friday November 1, 2019 8:30am - 11:00am
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:00am

Break
Friday November 1, 2019 11:00am - 11:15am
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 1.01: Postcolonialism and Womanism in Religious Education
W(Holy) Awareness: A Womanist Religious Education Curriculum Using Jazz for Prostate Cancer Awareness as a Case Study
Rondee Gaines (New York Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The span and multi-dimensionality of living, inter-institutional and inter-generational, embeds, within each of us, different ways of learning. Particularly, for those in faith communities, we are simultaneously learning and receiving education in faith, on a daily basis, in various situations. Christian tradition emphasizes death and suffering as redemptive processes through which resurrection channels the power of hope, healing, and educative purpose. Death, in Christian education, underscores that death can be life-giving. At a moment of death, Jazz for Prostate Cancer Awareness was birthed


The Exact Synonym for “Missionary” is Negro Teacher: Black Feminism in the Sunday School
Patricia Haggler (Medgar Evers College, CUNY)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Black churches operated as extended families for many African Americans in the Jim Crow South. Women teaching in those Sunday schools became other mothers not only to Sunday school scholars but to those in the community. The author’s contention is that African-American Sunday school teachers were equally as concerned about the political, economic, and social plight of black Americans as they were about bringing people to God. The local community was the mission field for African-American Sunday school teachers and a spiritual, historical, and political ethic of care was their mission.


Postcolonial Imagination and Liberating Interdependence for Divided Societies
Mariska Lauterboom (Graduate Theological Union)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper argues for the importance of combining postcolonial imagination and liberating interdependence in religious education conducted by a community of faith located in divided societies, using literature-based review and analysis and postcolonial historiography as methods. Postcolonial imagination and liberating interdependence lead to an intercultural education which promotes dialogue and liberation in the Indonesian context. It creates a safe space for indigenous people, their stories, and their cultures, as well as for Indonesian women to share their stories in religious education.



Keywords: african-american female teachers, african-american history, african-american sunday schools, community, culture, postcolonial, sacred spaces, story, womanism, womanist theology.




Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Trillium B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale
  • AV Projector
  • Setup Hollow Square and Rounds
  • Requested AV Projector

11:15am

Breakout 1.02: Contemplative Pedagogies and Meaning Making in Religious Education
The Practice of Prayer and Conversion to the Neighbor: Towards a Contemplative Pedagogy for Neighbor-Love
Jennifer Lewis (Boston University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] With religio-political polarization and out-group violence on the rise, what can religious educators do to foster compassion, understanding, and charity across lines of difference? Social neuroscience research suggests that empathy – the capacity to share in and understand another’s affective and mental states – can increase our compassion for others, reduce implicit bias and significantly influence our behavior towards those beyond our social groups. But if empathy leads to compassion and the kind of pro-social behavior that heals divisions, how can religious educators cultivate empathy? In two words: contemplative prayer. This paper brings Howard Thurman’s reflections on prayer and Gustavo Gutierrez’s concept of “conversion to the neighbor” into conversation with social neuroscience research on empathy, with the aim of showing how prayer might serve as pedagogical “path” towards empathy and a conversion to our neighbor characterized by boundary-breaking love.


Teaching Contemplatively for Unified Hearts and Communities
Patrick Manning (Seton Hall University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper highlights contemplative pedagogy as an educational approach with a demonstrated capacity to facilitate unification within the individual and among different people. The early parts of the paper present a biblically-rooted analysis of the human dynamics that impede peaceful coexistence and a discussion of the ways educators can exacerbate learners’ alienation from the transcendent, themselves, and others. The latter part of the paper discusses scientific research and the author’s own experiences that suggest possibilities for promoting unity through contemplative pedagogy.


Keywords: alienation, compassion, contemplative pedagogy, empathy, prayer, relatedness, self-reflection, social neuroscience, thurman.



Speakers
JL

Jennifer Lewis

Boston University
avatar for Patrick Manning

Patrick Manning

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology, Seton Hall University
As a religious educator, professor, and teacher formator, my goal is to facilitate transformative encounters with the Christian tradition in the classroom setting. Operating at the intersection of theology, education, and cognitive science, my work focuses on methods of theological/religious... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 1.03: The Role of Religious Education in Addressing Trauma
EXAMINING FAITH: THE INCLUSION OF THE SPIRITUALLY TRAUMATIZED LGBTQ BELIEVER OF COLOR IN AFFIRMING AND INCLUSIVE MINISTRIES
L. Covington (New York Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The main purpose of this presentation is to discuss the intersectionality of the emotional, psychological and spiritual damage sustained by LGBTQ Faith Believers of Color due to societal, familial, and religious influences. We will also examine how Religious Education can be utilized in understanding the lived experience of the LGBTQ Believer of Color and healing faith trauma within said community.


Addressing the Sex Abuse Crisis in Communities of Faith and Learning
Carl Procario-Foley (Iona College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper argues that educational communities of faith and learning (e.g. Catholic colleges) are especially primed to face into the pain and reality of the sex abuse crisis in the Catholic Church in honest and constructive ways. It recommends that religious educators and mental health professionals collaborate strategically and carefully to offer spaces that are both educational and healing for people to discuss the causes and impacts of the crisis. A pedagogy of open and dangerous memory is needed to attend to the real impacts of the crisis and to promote empathy for survivors.



Keywords: catholic church, coaching, college, faith, healing, lgbtq, pedagogy, sex abuse, trauma.



Speakers
avatar for L. Renair Covington

L. Renair Covington

Spiritual Development Consultant, Holokleria Coaching Services
Known as the "Pink Love Specialist," I am a healer, author, speaker, collaborator and advocate for justice/spiritual healing and harm reduction in the LGBTQIA+ faith community. I am also the founder of "LGBTQ Faith Matters," a non-profit initiative formed under my coaching practice... Read More →
CP

Carl Procario-Foley

Director Mission and Ministry, Iona College
mission education academic service-learning international service-learning interreligious partnerships


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 1.04: Religious Education and Youth
Language of Hope in Europe
Monique Dijk-Groeneboer (Tilburg School of Catholic Theology)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In Europe, the diversity in religions, cultures, languages and historical backgrounds is enormous. A longitudinal study amongst secondary school pupils from 1997 onwards revealed the language young people use for the things they value in live and which inspire them. Since 2017, the same study has been conducted in different European countries. A language is being developed rising above differences in religions and cultural backgrounds, starting a dialogue in the classroom across their differences. A pedagogy of hope develops that teaches peaceful coexistence in the classroom and in the world.


From Roots to Wings: Recasting the ‘Wedge Model’ of Youth Ministry into a Sacred Pedagogical Form
Jodi Hunt (University of Dallas)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] As neo-traditionalists continue to press forward a return to ‘how the Church once was’ postmodern religious educators worry that those who already live in the margins will continue to disaffiliate or disconnect from Christ’s liberating love. Using an inductive approach, this paper will outline the wedge model of youth ministry, deconstruct it, and then reconstruct it (in conversation with lived experience) as a sacred pedagogy centered upon teaching youth and young adults how to connect to and practice the liberating love of Christ.


Hip-hop As a Culturally Relevant Pedagogy for Religiously Educating Youth
Sharise Wigfall (New York Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] One significant reason that accounts for the lack of engagement with biblical content among young people is related to cultural relevancy. One option to consider when exploring alternative methods for biblical engagement is the significance and relevance of the cultures that are shaping and influencing the lives of urban youth. Hip-hop culture, preferably. Hip-hop is one of the most popular cultural movements and one of today’s most lasting and influential forms of art. Hip-hop, I argue, is a cultural relevant pedagogy essential for religiously educating youth.



Keywords: culture, disaffiliated, diversity, europe, hip-hop, language, neo-traditional, pedagogy, post-modern, religious education, sacred pedagogy, youth, youth , youth ministry.



Speakers
avatar for Jodi Hunt

Jodi Hunt

Professor, University of Dallas


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 1.05: Religious Pluralism and Religious Education
"Kierkegaardian Incommensurability and Spiritual Dysphoria: Analysis of a Confliction on the Campuses of Catholic Colleges and Universities"
Noel Adams (Marquette University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Drawing on Kierkegaard's proposal that religious faith is incommensurable with a rational understanding of actuality, I contribute to the contemporary debate between two sides that articulate what it means for a university to be both truly modern and Catholic. Observing that today's Catholic universities are no longer typically comprised of mostly Catholic faculty or even mostly Catholic students, I articulate a new phenomenon on Catholic campuses: spiritual dysphoria. I argue that this arises from the actual conditions that are paradoxical in the way that Kierkegaard conceives of it.


Cultivating the Capacity for Moral Imagination: Developing a Constructive Postmodern Theological Curriculum in Higher Education
Tracey Lamont (Loyola University, New Orleans)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Graduate students in ministry and religious education often discuss how challenging it is, in their ministries and in their personal lives, to engage with people who espouse an ideological worldview deeply different from their own. This study explores how religious educators in higher education can nurture the capacity for what John Paul Lederach calls the moral imagination by developing a constructive postmodern theological curriculum and teaching strategies that encourage dialogue across ideological difference.




Keywords: catholic identity, contingency, curriculum, higher education, ideology, incommensurability, moral imagination, national dialogue, pedagogy, plural religious education, praxis, religious education in plural society, religious pluralism, spiritual dysphoria, trans-religious education.



Speakers
NA

Noel Adams

Associate Professor, Marquette University
avatar for Tracey Lamont

Tracey Lamont

Assistant Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans
Assistant Professor of Religious Education at Loyola University, New Orleans, Loyola Institute for Ministry.


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale
  • AV Projector
  • Setup Theater
  • Requested AV Projector

11:15am

Breakout 1.06: Normativity and Innovation Future Oriented Religious Education
How to work with normativity in the Religious Education faculty/program
Jos De Kock (ETF Leuven)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] How does a sufficient reflection on normativity look like in teaching religious educators? Partly based on the theoretical frameworks of De Kock and Norheim (2018) and De Kock, Sonnenberg and Renkema (2018) directions for working with normativity in RE faculties/programs is provided and discussed on. These directions are based on taking empirical observations in RE practices (including the daily lifes of students) as a starting point for organizing pedagogical and theological reflection on the level of four layers of normativity.


The Essential Role of Innovation for Educating in Faith and Life that Promotes Inclusion and Respectful Relationships: Some findings from an Action Research Study of Adult Faith Education in Canada 
Carol Kuzmochka (Saint Paul University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Among the findings of an Action Research Study of Adult Faith Education in Canada is the realization that innovative educational frameworks are – themselves – a source of hope for moving toward transforming practice that heals the division between faith and life. This paper explores how engaging an awareness-based action research approach and creative exaptation unleashes interdisciplinary wisdom from religious education, business change management, and social sciences to innovate adult religious education that promotes inclusion and respectful relationships - rather than divided societies.


Challenges and Opportunities for Asian Canadian Immigrant Churches and its educational implications
Nam Soon Song (Knox College of the University of Toronto)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The research explores the opportunities and challenges for Asian Canadian Immigrant churches that are simultaneously housing first and second-generation congregants in two or three separate language services under the same roof. This research seeks critical information and educational implications to help transform current challenges into opportunities for these churches by examining what responses are required by ACICs to be relevant in meeting the needs of the two or three language congregants, which will lead to a sense of the future direction for these churches.



Keywords: action research, asian canadian, canadian adult faith education, creative expectation, empirical research, future church, innovation, multicultural, normativity, pedagogy, re program, theology.



Speakers
avatar for Carol Kuzmochka

Carol Kuzmochka

researcher and part-time professor, Saint Paul University
I'm the principal researcher for an Action Research Project on Adult Faith Education in Canada. I also teach and practice.
JD

Jos De Kock

ETF Leuven


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 1.07: Interreligious and Interfaith Education in Pluralistic Society
Teaching the Black Christian Story and the Revival of African-American Religious Education within Black Pentecostal Movement
Darryl Brackeen (YMCA)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The Black Pentecostal experience has been separated from its historical origins and they are seen as conservative Bible viewers and are marginalized. This problem persists because of the unique social and cultural circumstances that have shaped Black Pentecostal religious education and spirituality. Therefore, the separation may have been synonymous to survival in a racially divided nation. The thesis of this historical reflection and research is to insist on the reunification of African American religious education, historical context, and the Black spiritual Pentecostal experience.


A “Necessity of the Age”: The 1893 World’s Parliament of Religions as a Public Pedagogy of Hope
Dennis Gunn (Iona College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The 1893 World’s Parliament of Religions offered a public pedagogy of hope by promoting the idea of coexistence amidst religious diversity. The Parliament advanced the cause of interreligious dialogue as the one of the first gatherings devoted to the cause of interreligious cooperation in the modern era. This paper raises up lessons from the Parliament for the present that suggest both the challenges and the possibilities of fostering peaceful cooperation between religious traditions.


Nurturing Coexistence in Divided Societies: A Model Account of Common Language for a Pluralistic Religious Education
Abe Rabinowich (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] For this year’s REA conference topic “Coexistence in Divided Societies: Pedagogies of the Sacred, of Difference, and of Hope” I present a newly research study of the journey of the Jewish Education Committee (JEC) in the later part of the early twentieth century (1944-1950). The JEC attempted to unify the multiple denominational groups within Judaism by creating a common language for a pluralistic Jewish religious education. The JEC sought to centralize and establish a common goal for Jewish religious education. The study will also explore some of the similar challenges faced by Christian religious educators to unify the multiple denominational groups within the Religious Education Association (REA). By discussing the parallel challenges faced by the JEC and the REA, the study will offer a model account of common language for nurturing coexistence in divided societies today.



Keywords: "beyond-denominational" , "centralization" of religious education, "pluralistic-model" of religious education, "rea" quest for unity, finding-unity" within diversity, historical methodology, interreligious, rea, world's parliament of religions.



Speakers
avatar for Darryl Brackeen

Darryl Brackeen

District Executive Director, Central Connecticut Coast YMCA
Hon. Darryl Brackeen Jr, is New Haven native who is an elected official serving on the City of New Haven Board of Alderman. He also serves as the District Executive Director of the New Haven, Hamden/North Haven YMCA. Darryl has served as a long time youth & young adult ministry leader... Read More →
DG

Dennis Gunn

Iona College
avatar for Abe Rabinowich

Abe Rabinowich

Doctoral Student and Research Assistance, Fordham University, School of Religion and Religious Education


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacDonald A

11:15am

Breakout 1.08: Engaging the Other in Religious Education
Mine Eyes Do Fail with Tears: Anti-Semitism and the Christian Response
Barbara Javore (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Anti-Semitism is on the rise in the United States and Europe. There has been an alarming increase in the number of hate crimes targeting Jewish people. Currently only eight states in the U.S. mandate education on the Holocaust, leading to a profound lack of awareness of the effects of anti-Semitism. Sadly, Christian attitudes toward Judaism over the centuries have strongly contributed to anti-Semitic behavior. It is imperative that Christian congregations provide opportunities to educate about anti-Semitism and to establish and strengthen empathic relationships with Jewish congregations.


Sacred, Revolutionary Teaching: Encountering Sacred Difference and Honest Hope
Mary Elizabeth Moore (Boston University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Sacred teaching takes many forms across religious traditions, focusing on sacramentality and sacramental living in Christianity, questing in Judaism, and spiritual and social practices in both. At the heart of Jewish, Muslim, and Christian traditions are accents on the sacredness of life, imago dei, and human dignity. The paper analyzes these traditions to discover the textures of sacrality and faces of sacred teaching and learning. Such teaching is revolutionary, engaging spiritual practices and pedagogies of difference to cultivate radical compassion, openness, humility, and hope.



Keywords: abrahamic traditions, anti-semitism, difference, empathy, experiential learning and community-based learning , holocaust, hope, indonesian context, interreligious education, live-in education (immersion education), other, religious conflict, revolutionary, sacred, teaching, white nationalism.



Speakers
BJ

Barbara Javore

Minister, Adjunct Professor, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Aesthetic Empathy and Sacred Imagining are intrinsic to the work I am developing.
avatar for Mary Elizabeth Moore

Mary Elizabeth Moore

Professor, Boston University


Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacDonald B

11:15am

Breakout 1.09: ALLLM: Faith in Action
Faith in Action: For the Common Good
()

Using the opening session, “Where Help and Harm Collide: Responding to the Opiate Crisis in Toronto” as a case study, this workshop invites participants to explore how post-degree professional development and learning can support and encourage ministry leaders of faith communities to lead theologically and practically within their contexts. Attendance at the opening session not required.



Keywords: .



Friday November 1, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacKenzie Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

Community Luncheon
Friday November 1, 2019 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Trillium C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

1:15pm

Lightning Round
Moderator: Jos de Kock, Evangilsche Theologische Facultiet, Lueven, The Netherlands

Friday November 1, 2019 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Trillium C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

1:45pm

Poster 1: Pedagogy of Reconciliation and Renewal
Pedagogy of Reconciliation and Renewal for Ethnic, Immigrant Communities in North America: Biblical Hermeneutics as an Educational model to Address Generational, Cultural, and Theological Divides in the Diaspora
Sarah Han (Knox College of the University of Toronto)

This poster presentation will propose pedagogy of reconciliation and renewal for immigrant communities in North America. Even within one ethnic faith community there exist cultural, generational, and theological divides. A dialogical pedagogy that focuses on a model of Biblical hermeneutics and invites individuals into the common ground of scripture can create a space where differences can be mutually embraced and evolved. The renewed, united ethnic community – with its clear voice and identity that is founded upon scripture – can then engage in public theology in the diaspora and beyond.



Keywords: .



Speakers
SH

Sarah Han

Doctorate Student, Knox College, Toronto School of Theology


Friday November 1, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale
  • Setup Theater
  • Requested AV Projector,Internet

1:45pm

Poster 2: Field-testing Sabbath Friendship
Field-testing Sabbath Friendship as an Ecological Model of Religious Education
Sally Johnston (Union Presbyterian Seminary)

As an ecological model of religious education, can the practice of Sabbath Friendship nurture coexistence in divided societies? My poster session will outline a design to field-test this ecological model for religious education. Can a year of participating in the practice of Sabbath Friendship move persons toward a more ecological self, defined as a self embracing greater relatedness to those/that from whom/which there has been estrangement -- including estrangement from other persons, groups, one's embodied self, and from the earth?



Keywords: .



Speakers
avatar for Sally Johnston

Sally Johnston

Educational Ministry. Adjunct Professor., Union Presbyterian Seminary
I am interested in encouraging dialogue about ecological models of religious education and spiritual models of ecological education.


Friday November 1, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale
  • Setup Theater
  • Requested AV Internet

2:30pm

Breakout 2.01: Teaching for Human Rights in Diverse Settings
Contingency Sensitivity as the Basis of Religious Education in Plural Societies
Zekirija Sejdini (School of Education/University of Innsbruck)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The situation and role of religious education in Europe has changed rapidly. Above all, migration and globalization contributed to the increase of religious plurality and the diversity of worldviews. This development also poses new challenges for religious education, whose management is of enormous importance for the preservation of a pluralistic society. Above all, it requires innovative concepts of religious education, which deal constructively with pluralism. An example of such an approach is the concept of a contingency-sensitive religious didactics.


The Ecology of Religious Education to Consider Carefully the Pedagogy of Difference in the Korean Context
Dr. Moon Son (Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea)
Prof. Changho Lim (Kosin University, Busan, Korea)
Prof. Nan Ye Kim (Korea Baptist University, Daejon, Korea)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This study aims to consist of a human rights education program for children to encourage teacher-child interaction as liturgical practices in light of the pedagogy of difference. The liturgical practice for children means constitutive practices to reconstruct the relationship between adults and children and then to produce a transcendental difference as God’s children in Christian faith lives. The researchers consist of the sacred and secular examples for the pedagogy of difference as liturgical practice for children in Korean contextual environment, using qualitative and quantitative studies.


Keywords: children's liturgical practices, teacher-child interaction, vulnerable image of the self, inner self, young North Korean refugees, worldview, human rights, Contingency, trans-religious education, plural religious education, religious education in plural society



Speakers
ZS

Zekirija Sejdini

Univ.-Prof. Mag., Institute of Islamic Theology and Religious Education, Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Innsbruck
avatar for Moon Son

Moon Son

Adjunct Professor, Yonsei University
Adjunct Professor of Christian Education in College of Theology at Yonsei University, Seoul in South Korea/ Research Fellow of Yonsei-UNIGE Collaborative Institute at Yonsei University/ Pastor, Korean Methodist Church/ Member, Religious Education Association (REA:APPRRE)/ Teaching... Read More →
NY

Nan Ye Kim

Korea Baptist University, Daejon, Korea
avatar for Changho Lim

Changho Lim

Vice President, Kosin University
Vice President, Kosin University in Busan, South Korea/ Prof. of Christian Education Department/ Principal of Jangdaehyun School/ Pastor of Presbyterian Church in Korea(Kosin)/ Chairman of North Korea Human Rights and Democratization, Foundation(NKHRD, Non Profit Organization NGO... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Trillium B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.02: Catholic and Jewish Insights in Religious Education
Reflections on the Tree of Life: Noah, the flood and the Tower of Babel
Deborah Court (Bar-Ilan University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In Judaism the Torah is represented as a Tree of Life, a source of wisdom and happiness. Every religion's holy scriptures contain depths of wisdom which can help us find our way in this troubled world. This session will be based in the Jewish tradition of searching for through study of the weekly Torah portion. The portion during the REA conference is Noah, the stories of the flood and the Tower of Babel. Commentaries on these stories will be discussed, and dialogue generated about how scriptural study from all traditions can help us address questions raised by the conference theme.


How do you teach it (In our day)?: Examining portrayals of Jews and Judaism in Catholic catechesis.
Graham McDonough (University of Victoria)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Today, more than 50 years after the Second Vatican Council issued Nostra Aetate (1965), how well does Catholic catechesis present Jews and Judaism? This presentation examines Catholic catechetical materials to answer that question. It finds that curricular representations of Jews and Judaism, no matter how well-meaning, are often simplistic to the degree that they may enable the conditions that reproduce supercessionist thinking and attitudes. Its conclusion argues that current curricula would be improved if they were revised to include strong and generous presentations of Jews and Judaism.



Keywords: catechesis, catholic, catholicism, connecting religions , human experience, judaism, lgbtqia+, noah, nostra aetate, pluralism, queer theology, supersessionism, torah insights, tower of babel, tree of life.



Speakers
avatar for Deborah Court

Deborah Court

Associate Professor, Bar-Ilan University
Deborah Court is a retired associate professor in the School of Education at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Her research centers on school culture, religious education, interfaith and intercultural education, the nature of teachers' knowledge, and qualitative research methodologies... Read More →
GM

Graham McDonough

Associate Professor, University of Victoria


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Algonquin A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.03: Addressing Trauma in Religious Education
Crossing the Border: Religious Education of Coexistence for North Korean Refugees in the U.S.
Heesung Hwang (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Among many refugee groups who cross the borders for life, my research pays attention to North Korean refugees in the United States and their settlement process. As North Korean refugees enter this land of freedom and prosperity, are they provided adequate aids and education to redirect their mindset from communism to capitalism, from oppression and trauma to living together? What is the role of faith community and religious education? Based on the postcolonial feminist practical theology, this paper will explore their journey and offer a pedagogy of mutual transformation and coexistence.


Faith Groups Perceptions of Moral Injury
Joseph Lynch (United States Military Academy)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Moral injury is an issue that has a growing interest within both the Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration. Both military and VA chaplains are focusing more attention on members of the military and veterans who experience a moral injury. It can occur when a person does something that goes against his or her moral code or fails to do something that is in line with his or her moral code. Each major faith group has its perception and response to moral injury. It is the understanding of these perceptions and responses that can bring unity of focus on moral injury treatment.


“Get Home Safely”: A Pedagogy of the Sacred for Survival in a Divided Society
Karen Mosby (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The 2015 video, “Get Home Safely,” addresses the reality that Black youth and young adults in the U.S. have disproportionately more encounters with police that result in physical violence, incarceration, and/or death. Historically, Blacks have prioritized survival in educating their younger generations for co-existence in the racially hostile and divided context of the U.S. This education has occurred formally and informally in homes, schools, community organizations, and in congregations. This paper examines aspects of a pedagogy of the sacred for the survival of Black emerging generations.



Keywords: black youth/young, capitalism, critical, grand rounds, interdependence, interreligious dialogue, moral injury, nones and nuns, pedagogy, pedagogy of the sacred, racism, refugees, safety, survival, trauma.



Speakers
avatar for Heesung Hwang

Heesung Hwang

Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Education, Chicago Theological Seminary
avatar for Joseph Lynch

Joseph Lynch

Director of Religious Education, United States Military Academy
I am a PhD candidate at Fordham University. My dissertation is focused on moral injury/moral damage.I am a director of religious education at West Point, the home of the United States Military Academy. I am retired United Methodist clergy.
KM

Karen Mosby

Student, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Algonquin B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.04: Education in Alternative Worldviews
Will You Talk With Me? Welcoming the Faithful and the Skeptical in an Undergraduate Religious Studies Course
Cynthia Cameron (Rivier University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Catholic universities, indeed most religiously affiliated universities, find that religious belonging cannot be assumed and that many students are skeptical of faith. This challenges the religious studies instructor who assumes her task is to provide a summary of Christian faith. This paper argues for shifting the focus away from this approach and to one that engages students in dialogue about humanity’s core questions using texts from the Christian tradition. This pedagogical change can lead to more critical engagement and even to more curiosity about the Christian tradition.


Pedagogies of Difference: (secularized) Christian and Islamic Perspectives
Ina Ter Avest (VU University and Inholland University, Amsterdam)
Omer Gurlesin ()
Ibrahim Kurt ()
Alper Alasag ()

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Education is a key for the development of participative citizenship of children and youngsters. Education opens for individuals a world of different positioning and stimulates the development of an own authentic life orientation. Life orientation has a different point of reference for Christian and Islamic pedagogy. In this article Christian and Islamic religious education in an institution for secondary and for higher education will be compared according to their curriculum in the Netherlands regarding their approach of ‘the other’, taking into account the context of the plural Dutch society.


Worldview Literacy in Education: Advancing Mutual Understanding in Diverse Societies
John Valk (University of New Brunswick)
Mualla Selçuk ()

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Diverse societies face increasing racial tension, social divide, religious illiteracy, and secularism. What role can education play in confronting these challenges? Universities generate scientific knowledge but less so the search for meaning. Worldview Studies encompasses both as views of life and ways of life. Exploring various worldviews becomes a search for meaning and a journey into knowing self and other. This paper engages multiple partners to develop teaching pedagogies, curricula and educational tools to enhance greater knowledge, awareness and understanding of various worldviews.



Keywords: (prevention of) radicalisation, catholic education, catholic studies, christian pedagogy., curriculum, difference, discussion pedagogy, diversity, higher education, internationl collaboration, islamic pedagogy, university pedagogy, worldview education.



Speakers
CC

Cynthia Cameron

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Rivier University
avatar for Mualla Selçuk

Mualla Selçuk

Professor, Ankara University
Prof. Dr. Mualla Selçuk graduated from Ankara University School of Divinity with a B.Sc. degree. She was appointed as a research assistant in the same school and later granted a Ph.D. following the dissertation of her doctoral thesis called "Religious Patterns in the Education of... Read More →
JV

John Valk

Professor, University of New Brunswick


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Algonquin C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.05: Young Adults and Religious Education on Campus
Forgotten Margins: How do students of minority religions engage with their faith during college?
Julia Collett (Millersville University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The purpose of this research interest group is to understand how college students practicing minority religions are engaging with their faith during their undergraduate years. Major themes throughout the paper will explore how students are developing their religious identities and how student affairs professionals and faculty members are aiding in students’ religious identity development. This literature review analysis will explore what colleges are doing to support students of minority religions and pose solutions so that all students can feel safe to practice their faith on campus.


Deliberative Democratic Theological Education: A Proposal for Youth Ministry that Builds Peace
Elizabeth Corrie (Candler School of Theology, Emory University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Drawing on research in civic engagement pedagogies, insights from a youth ministry community of practice, and debates within justice-focused theological scholarship, this paper will develop a sacred pedagogy that engages theological concepts connected to histories of violence and intolerance through deliberative, democratic dialogue, teaching young people skills in engaging across difference as well as habits of theological thinking for a lifetime of spiritual growth. The paper will include both conceptual analysis and practical recommendations for curricular design.


Listening for the Sacred: A Method and Pedagogy Toward Hope
Jennifer Moe (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Active listening and storytelling are proving to be effective practices toward generating empathy and compassion across different generations, cultures, and beliefs. In this paper I explore the methods of Holy Listening and storytelling as means used by faith communities and public agencies to create spaces where storytellers and listeners can be transformed by the simple acts of sharing and listening. Practitioners of religious education can use methods of Holy Listening and storytelling to promote learning across barriers as well as to learn more about the lives of their own faith communitie



Keywords: campus culture, christology or theology, civic engagement, deliberative pedagogy, empathy, faith, higher ed, listening, minority religions, peace, practices, storytelling, young adults, youth ministry.



Speakers
EC

Elizabeth Corrie

Associate Professor, Candler School of Theology, Emory University
Youth Ministry, Peace Education
JC

Julia Collett

Millersville University
JM

Jennifer Moe

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Algonquin D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.06: Diversity in Religious Education
Jesus' Sermon on the Mount as Pedagogy for Crossing Divides and Encountering the Other
Scott Geminn (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount offers a pedagogical framework for Christian belief and identity, yet it also provides a pedagogical framework and strategy for encountering and experiencing “the other” in ways that can bridge the polarizing aspects of religion, nationality, culture, gender and race. The insights of the Matthean Jesus concerning retaliation, love for enemies, and projection can be used to religiously educate towards awareness of the humanity of “the other” and also the awareness of the humanity of one’s self. Thus, leading to dialogue, understanding, and humanization.


In Public Spaces: Hosting Religious Conversation Across Diversity in Secular Quebec
Alyson Huntly (United Theological College)
Jennifer Guyver (McGill University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In Quebec, attitudes to public religion range from cautious to overtly hostile. This paper documents work to engage religion in the public sphere, by creating a multidisciplinary site for practice, research, and learning in a Montreal neighbourhood. Researchers formed listening circles to create dialogue across religious, spiritual, and cultural diversity. The results reveal the difficulty of creating public space, the significance of this kind of “third space,” and the ways narrative and artistic practice helped move the discourse from rational conversation about faith to deep encounter.



Keywords: black church, diversity, expression, humanization, intercultural, interfaith, liberation theology, narrative research, null/explicit, other, pentecostal, projection, secular québec, social justice, spirituality, story, wholeness.



Speakers
avatar for Scott Geminn

Scott Geminn

Fordham University
AH

Alyson Huntly

United Theological College
JG

Jennifer Guyver

McGill University


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.07: Imagination, Creativity, and Inner Truth in Religious Education
“Students Speaking Their Truth: Cultivating Critical Testimony in an Undergraduate Intro to Theology Class”
John Falcone (Union Theological Seminary and Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This article-length, introductory reading for an undergraduate core Theology course seeks to meet students where they are at. It situates faith, reason, inquiry, science and critical thinking in a framework of testimony and authenticity that is pluralist, democratic, realist, and interpersonally-based. It builds on the commitments of the Classical Pragmatism to create a ‘pedagogy of difference’ which is recognizably contemporary and recognizably (North/South) American. And it offers teachers multiple ways into the faith, life, metacognitive experience of early college aged students.


Let’s Live Together in a Sweet Home
Huong Nguyen (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] It is sad to admit that people are divided because of colors, races, and spiritual differences. There is an urgent need to build a world where people can truly feel at home. I believe that religious educators are called to assist our brothers and sisters to walk and to live together in our universal home. Rabbi Jonathan Sacks reminds us that the diversity is what institutes our humanity. Therefore, it is important to shape and reshape our religious curriculum since it covers all aspects of life. Let's hope and imagine that in the near future we will live together in love and harmony.


Keywords: creativity, critical thinking, curriculum, differences, dignity, experience, faith, pragmatism, prophetic imagination, semiotic realism.



Speakers
HN

Huong Nguyen

Fordham University
avatar for John Falcone

John Falcone

Visiting assistant professor of Practical Theology, Union Theological Seminary; Fordham University


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
MacDonald A

2:30pm

Breakout 2.08: Sustainable Scientific Energies?
Sustainable Scientific Energies? How will we reconsider our academic work in the light of the ecological crisis?
Bert Roebben (University of Bonn)
Reto Knutti ()

There is a growing interest in sharing and discussing RE research findings internationally. But there is also a value conflict, when considering the ecological impact of organizing research in traditional ways and the growing awareness of climate challenges. This session discusses in a constructive live and virtual format the issue of how to convene in international settings for scholarly exchange. Are there other ways of doing research exchange and cooperation than through being actually present in conferences and physical meetings? What about our ecological footprint?



Keywords: .




Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
MacDonald B

2:30pm

Breakout 2.09: ALLLM: Educating Congregations
Educating Congregations, Twenty-five Years Later
Helen Blier (Pittsburgh Theological Seminary)





Keywords: .



Speakers
avatar for Helen Blier

Helen Blier

Director of Continuing Education, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
Helen is a graduate of Emory University (Ph.D.) and Boston College (M.Ed. and A.B., theology). She joined the Seminary staff in September 2013. She was the former director of student information and organizational evaluation at the Association for Theological Schools (ATS). There... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
MacKenzie Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Breakout 2.10: Introduction to Design Thinking and Using It for Grant Applications
Are you curious about ways to transform your inspiration and creativity from an idea into reality? Come discover the dynamic and collaborative approach known as Design Thinking. We will explore and experiment with your own ideas by practicing the five step process of empathize, define, ideate, prototype and test (not your typical test!) developed at Stanford University's Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design (d.school). We’ll also draw on the REA’s own Wornom Grant application as a template for articulating your proposal as a potentially fundable project. Sponsored by the Harper/Wornom Committee.

Speakers
avatar for Maureen O'Brien

Maureen O'Brien

Professor, Duquesne University
avatar for Sarah Tauber

Sarah Tauber

Professor, Jewish Theological Seminary
Professor Sarah Tauber is an assistant professor of Jewish Education at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and a rabbinic candidate in the Jewish Renewal network's rabbinic program (Aleph). Sarah's trajectory as a teacher, writer, scholar and activist in the world of education... Read More →
avatar for Joshua Lunde-Whitler

Joshua Lunde-Whitler

My areas of interest include narrative identity, lifelong religious formation that promotes justice, and the present-future of theological education. In 2018 I received a PhD in Theology and Education from Boston College, and my dissertation focused on narrative identity and development... Read More →
avatar for Lucinda Mosher

Lucinda Mosher

Faculty Associate in Interfaith Studies, Hartford Seminary
I am a moral theologian in the Anglican tradition who specializes in multireligious concerns, with emphasis on Christian-Muslim understanding. For Hartford Seminary, I teach online courses in comparative theology, theology of religions, and engagement of religious diversity. I represent... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

3:45pm

Break
Friday November 1, 2019 3:45pm - 4:00pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

4:00pm

Plenary 2: Hermeneutics of the Other and Theology of Difference
This plenary is on the topic: “Hermeneutics of the Other and Theology of Difference.” It will feature Deborah Kerdeman, a former President of the Philosophy of Education Society of North America, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Education at the University of Washington, USA, Michelle Voss Roberts, Principal and Professor of Theology at Emmanuel College, University of Toronto, Canada, and Elie Holzer, Ochs Chair for Teaching Jewish Religious Studies and Professor in the School of Education at Bar Ilan University, Israel. This session will include the study of texts from the New Testament, the Koran and Rabbinic literature about teaching & learning.

Speakers
MH

Mehmet Hilmi Tuna

Institute for Islamic Theology and Religion, University of Innsbruck
avatar for Deborah Kerdeman

Deborah Kerdeman

Emeritus professor, College of Education, University of Washington
As a philosopher of education, I aim to help students cultivate the dispositions, habits of mind, and skills of critical reasoning that will enable them to confront, analyze, and learn from life’s existential and moral challenges.  In an age dominated by instrumental discourse... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Voss Roberts

Michelle Voss Roberts

Principal and Professor of Theology, Emmanuel College of Victoria University in the University of Toronto
Michelle Voss Roberts is the 13th principal of Emmanuel College and the first woman to lead the institution as Principal in its 90-year history.An expert in comparative theology, with a particular focus on Christian and Hindu contexts, Voss Roberts has also written widely about aesthetics... Read More →
avatar for Elie Holzer

Elie Holzer

Ochs Chair for Teaching Jewish Religious Studies and Director of the Stern Institute for the Study and Advancement of Religious Education, Bar Ilan University
Rabbi Elie Holzer serves as Associate Professor and holds the R. Dr. Ochs Chair for Teaching Jewish Religious Studies at the School of Education, Bar Ilan University, Israel. He is a practice-oriented philosopher of education who specializes in Jewish thought and in philosophical... Read More →


Friday November 1, 2019 4:00pm - 5:45pm
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

6:00pm

Kabbalat Shabbat (all welcome)
Welcoming Shabbat is a weekly opportunity to take a break from the pressures of the week and find rest and sanctity amongst family or friends around a festive table. It heralds a time of contemplation and sacredness as the 25 hour Jewish Sabbath commences with the onset of the evening hour. Kabbalat Shabbat is marked by song and story, blessings over bounty of body and spirit. We invite the REA community to join together as participants and witnesses to this moment in Jewish time. For as Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel taught us “The Sabbath Day is like a Palace in time with a kingdom for all”.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Shire

Michael Shire

Chief Academic Officer. Dean, Shoolman Graduate School of Jewish Education and Graduate Programs in Jewish Studies. Professor of Jewish Education, Hebrew College


Friday November 1, 2019 6:00pm - 6:30pm
Trillium C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

6:30pm

Community Dinner
Friday November 1, 2019 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Trillium C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00pm

Participants of Color Meet and Greet
If you identify as a Participant of Color, come to our meet and greet on Friday at 8pm to meet with others and have conversation. Light refreshments served.

Friday November 1, 2019 8:00pm - 9:30pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00pm

Working Groups and Other Gatherings
Friday November 1, 2019 8:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA
 
Saturday, November 2
 

7:30am

Student Breakfast
Student breakfast funded by Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion.

Saturday November 2, 2019 7:30am - 9:00am
Trillium B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

7:30am

Working Groups and Other Gatherings
Saturday November 2, 2019 7:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:00am

Senior Scholars Work Group
Speakers
TG

Tom Groome

Boston College


Saturday November 2, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Algonquin A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00am

Registration
Saturday November 2, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

9:00am

Plenary 3: Disrupting the Consequences of Difficult Histories through Education
This plenary will feature Jabari Mahiri, Briton Family Professor of Urban Education at the University of California, Berkeley and author of Deconstructing Race: Multiculturalism beyond the Color-Bind, Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng, Professor of Religious Education Emeritus at Emanuel College, University of Toronto, Tsafrir Goldberg, Sr. Lecturer in Education at the University of Haifa, and Magda Gross, Sr. Research Associate at the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching, Stanford University.

Moderators and Responders
avatar for Christine Hong

Christine Hong

Assistant Professor of Educational Ministries, Columbia Theological Seminary
Dr. Hong is the chair of the Religious Education in Public Life and the Global Community standing committee of the Board of the Religious Education Association.

Speakers
avatar for Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng

Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng

Emerita professor of religious education, Emmanuel College in Victoria University in the University of Toronto
A long-time member of the Association of Professors, Practitioners, and Researchers in Religious Education (APPRRE)-who served on its Executive Committee in 1995-1996, and was President in 2001-2002-REV. DR. GREER ANNE Wenh-In NG (1936-) is currently the only Asian North American... Read More →
avatar for Tsafrir Goldberg

Tsafrir Goldberg

Senior lecturer, University of Haifa
A Bible and history teacher for twelve years, Tsafrir Goldberg's experiences in diverse classrooms in an urban school have led to a life time interest in the ways students identity intertwines with their engagement in difficult histories. His studies document the ways Israelis of... Read More →
avatar for Magdalena Gross

Magdalena Gross

Senior research associate, Center to Support Excellence in Teaching, Stanford University
Magdalena H. Gross is a Senior Research Associate at the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching at Stanford University. Magda examines the relationship between school knowledge and cultural knowledge of difficult historical episodes. She links concrete findings to broader areas... Read More →


Saturday November 2, 2019 9:00am - 11:00am
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:00am

Break
Saturday November 2, 2019 11:00am - 11:15am
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.01: Hermeneutics and Social Change in Religious Education
Witnessing in hermeneutical-communicative worldview education
André Mulder (Windesheim University of Applied Sciences)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] What is the function of teachers’ witnessing of faith in worldview education in the context of diversity? In hermeneutical-communicative learning on of the four teaching roles is model. While worldview education aims to support students in their personal worldview identity development, witnessing, which is an aspect of role modelling, seems to be aimed at the transmittal of a specific tradition. The concepts of witnessing, authenticity, moral agency, and self-disclosure are explored to shed light on witnessing in light of the generagoals of worldview education and connected hospitality


Toward ‘faith-adjacent’ pedagogies: ‘Repositioning’ the roles, spaces, and practices of religious education
Kyle Oliver (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Social and religious change are posing significant challenges for religious institutions and giving rise to novel forms of religious and spiritual community. How learning happens in such communities, and how religious educators can help shape it, is sometimes difficult to understand and describe via traditional framings of our work. In this conceptual analysis, I draw on social and anthropological literature and ethnographic field data from several recent studies to theorize “faith-adjacent” spaces, and to illustrate the analytic benefits and pedagogical possibilities raised by this reframing.


The Teacher: Specialist in a Pedagogy of Difference
Erik Renkema (Windesheim University of Applied Science)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] We consider a hermeneutical-communicative perspective on worldview education as meaningful in diversity: students are encouraged to explore their personal existence, to encounter differences and to develop their worldview literacy. We focus on the role of Specialist concerning the interpretation of this role in diversity and what teachers need for implementing this perspective. We will add former views by theoretical insights related to the use of worldview sources on an equal bases and to schools that educate students in a particular faith tradition.



Keywords: audiences of religious education, authenticity, diversity, hermeneutical communicative perspective, hermeneutical-communicative worldview education, hospitality., match w/mulder, match w/renkema, moral agency, new religious communities, roles of religious educators, social change, spatial theory, teacher as cultural guide, teacher roles, witnessing, worldview literacy.



Speakers
avatar for André Mulder

André Mulder

Professor of Theology and Worldview, Windesheim University of Applied Sciences Zwolle
avatar for Kyle Oliver

Kyle Oliver

Graduate Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
Kyle Oliver (@kmoliver) is an Episcopal priest and an EdD student in the Communications, Media, and Learning Technologies Design Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Previously he was digital missioner and instructor in the Center for the Ministry of Teaching at Virginia... Read More →
avatar for Erik Renkema

Erik Renkema

Assistant Professor and PhD-student Religious Education, Windesheim University of Applied Science


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Trillium B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.02: Ecology and Environmentalism in Religious Education
Educating for Ecological Conversion: An Ecstatic Pedagogy for Catholic/Christian Higher Education amid Climate Crisis
Christiane Lang Hearlson (Villanova University)
Dr. Timothy Hanchin (Villanova University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper, co-written by a Protestant religious educator and a Catholic religious educator, proposes pedagogies for ecological conversion appropriate to Catholic/Christian higher education in an age of environmental crisis. It acknowledges a cultural milieu marked by polarized discourse, skepticism of facts, fear of religious intolerance, and failure of encounter between rich and poor and humans and the earth. Drawing on theological and religious studies of conversion, as well as transformative pedagogies, it suggests use of narrative, personal encounter, and rituals of lament and praise.


Healing our Divide with the Non-Human World: Ecclesiological Trends Within the Wild Church Network
Wanda Stahl (Boston University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] A growing number of new faith communities in North America are emerging as part of the Wild Church Network. These outdoor church expressions seek to re-aquaint, re-cover, and re-member their faith communities as loving participants of the larger community of creation. This paper explores theological foundations and spiritual practices grounding the ecclesiologies of these communities. This study is based on data gathered from site visits, surveys, and interviews with Wild Church leaders and participants. Implications for faith formation in this era of climate change will be explored.


Cooperative Coexistence for Co-creation
Nathanael Thadikonda (Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology, Virginia Union University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] What does it cost to appreciate the differences and yet live in harmony as being Imago Dei- valuable lives created in the Image of God? Does it cost more than the lives killed in all such incidences throughout history to just let go of our own ego. How can we as religious educators, educate the educated illiterates? Where do we see the value in our society as we educate? What are the pedagogical practices that we are willing to adopt in out teaching methodologies that would impact the present and the future generations?


Keywords: alternative faith communities, attention, beloved community, bridge., co-creation/co-creators, co-educators, creation, eco-system, ecological conversion, environmentalism, faith formation, lonergan, neighbor, symbiosis, undergraduate pedagogy.



Speakers
avatar for Wanda Stahl

Wanda Stahl

Clinical Assistant Professor of Contextual Theology & Practice, Boston University School of Theology


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.03: Formation and Religious Education Across Difference Among Young Adults
By What Authority?: The necessary tension between emerging adults and religious faith
Emily Jendzejec (Boston College)
Theresa O'Keefe ()

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Research on religious faith and belonging, especially among emerging adults, can present faith in a binary manner as something one either has or does not have. We argue that reading such research from a constructivist-developmental lens, whereby faith is a meaning-making activity, we may see how emerging adults exhibit signs of growth appropriate to their age. In this paper, we look to the foundational work of Sharon Daloz Parks to identify the contours of religious faith found in young adulthood. We also recognize how communities of faith can support growth.


Against All Odds: Formational Education as Bridge across Deep Division
Megan Krakowiak (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Formational college education can promote dialogue across deep divisions. Regardless of university affiliation, students regularly declare themselves "spiritual, but not religious.” Deeper than a trend in contemporary language, transformational learning offers a possibility for a more complex relationship with the self, others, and the world. Whether or not a university claims to be forming its students, developmental theory would say students are, most certainly, in a stage of profound formation. This paper will overview the landscape and suggest a holistic, transformational way forward.



Keywords: belief, college, commitment, constructivist development theory, developmental, disaffiliation, diversity, myth, openness, research on religious belonging, transformational learning, young adults.



Speakers
MK

Megan Krakowiak

Boston College
avatar for Emily Jendzejec

Emily Jendzejec

Boston College
avatar for Theresa O'Keefe

Theresa O'Keefe

Professor, Boston College
Youth and young adult ministry. Oh, and sailing!


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.04: Thomas Merton and Religious Education
Silence as the "Mother of Speech": Cultivating a Contemplative Orientation for Dialogue and Communion Across Difference
Thomas Murphy (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This essay explores the role of silence and a contemplative orientation for religious education that can foster deep dialogue across difference. First, aspects of a Christian mystical tradition of contemplation and the practice of silence are explored through the work of Thomas Merton and others. A review of related contemplative pedagogical practices is then offered. Finally, these considerations are applied towards deepening the commitment within religious education to both honoring the unique agency and subjectivity of self and other and seeking communion within a diversity of perspectives.


Roots and Branches: The Origins and Potential of Mystagogy in Religious Education
Paul Melley (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper argues that incorporating a praxis of mystagogy within religious education is crucial for the church and our world today. It enables us to “sniff out grace” and be all the more likely to discern the mystery that inheres to daily life. A praxis of mystagogy incorporated into religious education helps to fashion people into mystics—a life-long process of becoming alert to God’s hidden presence by honoring the fundamental mode by which we know anything about God: intentional reflection on the encounter with God’s self-revelation and effective love through human experience.

Keywords: contemplative, merton, mystagogy, experience, sacramental, meaning-making,.



Speakers
PM

Paul Melley

Ph.D. Student, Theology & Education, Boston College
TM

Thomas Murphy

PhD Student, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.05: Crossing Boaders in Religious Education
The L’Arche Habitus: A Way of Being That Builds Unity in Difference
Elizabeth Barsotti (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] L’Arche is a community whose way of being is centered around relationships of mutuality, specifically with people of diverse abilities. Through the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu’s (1930-2002) concept of habitus, this paper probes how community shapes a person’s way of being. It unpacks the unique way L’Arche approaches community to demonstrate how particular aspects of the community facilitate building unity in a divided society. The paper will conclude with four insights from L’Arche that are applicable to other communities who seek to build unity in difference.


Curriculum of Spiritual Friendship: Learning for Mutual Witness within and across Borders of Religious and Spiritual Traditions
Julia Ji (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Central to authentic dialogue within and between different groups with diverse religious and spiritual traditions is learning and growth to balance and appreciate identity and diversity. Learning for mutual witness is a key task. This study seeks to explore how this mutual learning and witness undergoes in the space created by spiritual friendship. How this multi-layer of friendship with God, self, and others nurtures (1) spiritual identity and spiritual maturation and (2) authentic dialogue at three levels: intra-personal, inter-personal and inter-group within and across religious borders.


Cyber Church: Creating New Spaces for Persons with DisAbilities
Leslie Long (Oklahoma City University)
Sara Martin ()

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Students used the book Networked Theology to begin a discussion about the role of technology and ministry. Students worked together with the goal of examining how to make social media more accessible to people with disabilities. Although practicality was important they looked deeper-how can the church use social media to reach out in a meaningful way to people who are often overlooked or set aside? Are we missing the mark when it comes to the use of technology for engaging people of all abilities? This paper explores issues of community, ministry and outreach.



Keywords: accessibility, community, difference, disability studies, diverse abilities, learning, mutual witness, spiritual friendship, technology, theology, unity.



Speakers
EB

Elizabeth Barsotti

Boston College
LL

Leslie Long

Oklahoma City University
SM

Sara Martin

Student, Oklahoma City University


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Algonquin D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.06: Education for Cultural Sensitivity and Character in Pluralistic Society
Soul Tending and the Pedagogy of Hope: A Mixed Method Study Examining the Experiences of Racialized Students in Southern Ontario Catholic Schools
Marie Green (University of St. Michael's College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This study seeks to answer the following question: How effective are the equity and inclusive policies, implemented by Catholic schools in Ontario, in supporting the culture and identity of racially marginalized students who are not Catholic? The effectiveness of these policies, and their grounding in Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (Ladson-Billings 1995; Gay 2000), are examined within the context of the common theme of education for liberation, found in the philosophical views expressed by writers such as Jacque Maritain (1943), Paolo Freire (1970), and Grant Shockley (1988).


Teaching Elementary School Students Tolerance in Pluralistic Society: Indonesian case
Julia Suleeman (Faculty of Psychology Universitas Indonesia)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper is about the curriculum of character development for elementary school students in one Christian school in Klaten, Central Java province of Indonesia. The students learn about the importance of living in a pluralistic society and applying tolerance toward anyone, regardless of their religion and ethnic. To serve this purpose, a general theme of love was chosen that was reflected in loving God, loving oneself, loving others, and loving the enviroment. From here, nine characters were chosen and used to be developed in each grade.


Buddhicised Education in Schools: the case of Hong Kong Buddhist Association’s Program
Thomas Tse (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Focusing on the Hong Kong Buddhist Association’s current Buddhicised Education program, this paper reviews its framework and development. The Association considers a need for schools to improve the social milieu by strengthening moral and spiritual education with a specific Buddhist orientation. While keeping Buddhist knowledge and doctrines as the major values source and resources, the Association has widened its coverage into spiritual and life education; and re-designed the teaching materials and pedagogical methods in tandem with current issues and students’ daily lives.



Keywords: buddhicised education, buddhism, catholic education, character development program, culturally responsive pedagogy, education, elementary school children, hong kong, inclusive education, indonesia, pluralistic society, racialized students, school, soul tending, values education.



Speakers
MG

Marie Green

University of St. Michael's College
JS

Julia Suleeman

Lecturer, Faculty of Psychology Universitas Indonesia
TT

Thomas Tse

Associate Prof, Faculty of Education,The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.07: Philosophy and Dialogue in Religious Education
Educating for Peaceful Pro-Existence through a Model of “Live-in” Education in Indonesia
Alexander Asmara (Fordham Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The growth of religious conflict in the present time, particularly between Muslims and Christians, indicates that within Indonesia there is a deepening gap among religious believers. Responding to this crisis, this article argues that live-in as a model of religious education can be an alternative way to nurture peaceful pro-existence. First, live-in is an exposure to others through living and learning together. Second, live-in rooted rooted in “reflective pedagogy paradigm” is not only a method of learning but a spiritual journey to deepen relationships with God.


A Dialogical Cultural Approach to the Controversy between Israeli Traditionalists and Liberals
Marc Silverman (Hebrew University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Israel’s traditionalists’ claim: Israeli Jews are not ‘Jewish enough’, and Israel’s liberals’ claim: The former are ‘too Jewish’ comprise one of Israel's most divisive issues. A constructivist analysis of their cultural assumptions discloses they hold inflated cultural self-images and devalue each other’s culture. Using a dialogical-cultural paradigm, the paper proposes that traditionalists respect the liberals’ search for human fullness in Jewish political nationalism, and that liberals respect the traditionalists' sense of the decisive importance of historical memory in human culture.



Keywords: consciousness., dialogical discourse;, dialogue, essentialism;, hope, jiddu krishnamurti, monologist discourse;, multiculturalism;, paul, pedagogy, philosophy, seneca, serviceable other, social constructivism;, unconditioned mind.




Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacDonald A

11:15am

Breakout 3.08: Accessing, Opening, Engendering
Accessing the Sacred, Opening to Diversity, and Engendering Hope
Mary Hess (Luther Seminary)
Addie Walker ()
Boyung Lee ()

Collaborative Session. [Outline] Three lifelong dialogue partners frame an educational strategy for personal and professional growth as well as effective teaching that engages students and faculty in a cross-cultural and an intercultural pathway for learning and shaping of faith, identity, and capacity for welcoming difference. Teaching and learning life becomes a pathway of hope in a society and culture increasingly more complex and more stratified.



Keywords: .



Speakers
avatar for Mary Hess

Mary Hess

Professor of Educational Leadership, Luther Seminary
Mary E. Hess is Professor of Educational Leadership at Luther Seminary, where she has taught since 2000. During the 2016-2017 year she held the Patrick and Barbara Keenan Visiting Chair in Religious Education at the University of St. Michael’s College, in the University of Toronto.Hess... Read More →
avatar for Boyung Lee

Boyung Lee

Academic Dean and Professor of Practical Theology, Iliff School of Theology
Rev. Dr. Lee joined Iliff as Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty on July 1, 2017. Her theological and scholarly pursuit is fueled by a commitment to social justice and works hard to embody her commitment in her leadership and pedagogical practices. She... Read More →


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacDonald B

11:15am

Breakout 3.09: ALLLM: Centers for Lifelong Learning for Ministry
The Promises and Challenges of Independent Centers for Lifelong Learning for Ministry
Joshua Lunde-Whitler (Walker Center for Ecumenical Exchange)

Parker Palmer’s well-worn adage “To teach is to create a space…” holds particular weight for those invested in the lifelong formation of religious leaders who work in institutions that are primarily outside the traditional structures of academia or of organized denominations. This weight, however, does not come from being merely an articulation of a learner-centered pedagogy; rather it comes from the myriad questions that such independent centers and institutions routinely face: What kind of "space” are we, in fact? Are we tied to a physical place, and if so, why is that? How is this space educational? Who is being welcomed into this space, and who is not? What is my role as a leader/teacher here? Where does this organization fit within the landscape of theological/religious education? etc. This presentation will discuss these more or less “independent centers” of lifelong formation, which come in an array of forms. A selection will be examined both in terms of their merits as well as limitations, in order to consider how these centers offer unique value to the overall landscape of lifelong learning. A critical goal of this discussion is to explore some ideas together as to future possibilities for such centers. This is especially important, given the ever-shifting present-day landscape of both theological education as well as religious denominations. Participants should leave this presentation with their imaginations stimulated to consider ways that independent centers and institutions can serve as incubatory spaces which promote lifelong praxis for the common good.



Keywords: .



Speakers
avatar for Joshua Lunde-Whitler

Joshua Lunde-Whitler

My areas of interest include narrative identity, lifelong religious formation that promotes justice, and the present-future of theological education. In 2018 I received a PhD in Theology and Education from Boston College, and my dissertation focused on narrative identity and development... Read More →


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
MacKenzie Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:15am

Breakout 3.10: 2019 Wornom Innovation Grant Session - "Text Me"
Participants will be introduced to the Text Me: Ancient Jewish Wisdom Meets Contemporary Technology project with a special emphasis on the interfaith dimensions of faith in the digital ages.  We will raise up the voice of a Rabbi, Minister, and Imam working within the project.  More concretely the assembled group will help create the "interfaith" page of www.textmejudaism.com. We will likely also show, or at least hear about the video "It's complicated: Scully and the smartphone." This project has received support from the Wornom Innovation grant.

Speakers
RJ

Rabbi Jeffrey Schein

Kaplan Center for Jewish Education


Saturday November 2, 2019 11:15am - 12:30pm
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

Journal Board Meeting
Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Trillium B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

Catholic working group
Join the Catholic Community of Practice for a discussion of how the Catholic clergy sex abuse crisis is relevant for our work in religious education. Suggestions for preparation follow here.
A lay Catholic group called “Catholics for Change in Our Church” formed in the wake of last year’s Pennsylvania grand jury report. They now have become a nonprofit organization and established a website, https://ccoc-pgh.org/.
  • Visit their website and browse it, including the Resources section. Consider the following:
  • How does an organization like CCOC (and perhaps others you’re aware of) suggest an emerging model of religious education for Catholic faith communities and the public? Does it offer us as scholars/practitioners any new directions for our own work?
  • If you read any of the individual items in the Resources section, what do they offer you as new information and insights for your own practice of RE?
  • Other reflections, comments, questions that the topic raises for you in your RE work?
We’ll also allow some time for sharing relevant news and generating ideas for next year.

Speakers
avatar for Maureen O'Brien

Maureen O'Brien

Professor, Duquesne University


Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Algonquin C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

ALLLM Lunch and Business Meeting
Please note that pre-registration is required for the ALLLM lunch. This means you must have purchased this lunch while you were registering for the meeting.

Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

AANARE working group
During this meeting, we'll have Asian style lunch and fellowship, and the vision casting conversation for the future of AANARE. Whoever identifies as Asian/Asian North American or whoever interested in AANARE work in solidarity may join the meeting. Join us! You won't regret!

(The Asian and North American Asian work group welcomes everybody who is interested in the exploration, development, and enhancement of Asian/Asian North American perspectives in religious education.  As a Working Group of the REA/APRRE, we gather to provide one another collegial support and to stimulate thinking and discussion for the generation of new scholarship and resources.)

Speakers
avatar for Heesung Hwang

Heesung Hwang

Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Education, Chicago Theological Seminary


Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 3:15pm
Algonquin B Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:30pm

Adolescent Girls and Faith working group
Speakers
avatar for Emily Peck McClain

Emily Peck McClain

Participant Observer, Wesley Theological Seminary
Dr. Peck-McClain works in two different and related areas at Wesley Theological Seminary. She is the Visiting Professor of Christian Formation and Young Adult Ministries, spending her time both teaching Christian formation in the seminary classroom and also working as the theological... Read More →


Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 3:15pm
MacDonald B

12:30pm

Peace and Justice working group
We will be discussing the topic: "Fostering spaces for religious education for peace and justice during an election year." More details to follow soon!

Speakers
CP

Carl Procario-Foley

Director Mission and Ministry, Iona College
mission education academic service-learning international service-learning interreligious partnerships


Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 3:15pm
MacDonald A

12:30pm

Working Groups and Other Gatherings
Saturday November 2, 2019 12:30pm - 3:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

Horizons Board Meeting
Saturday November 2, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Algonquin D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

2:30pm

Black Experience working group
As a working group, members of the Black Experience working group gather to provide collegial support, mentoring of young scholars, create projects together, and to think together about new scholarship and resources that are needed. Our annual gathering begins with introductions and a discussion of the theme for the next REA/APPRE annual meeting. The floor is then open for any discussions that group members would like to raise. All those who are interested in adding to the voices of Religious Education scholars that center writings and projects on the experiences of Black people are welcomed to attend.

Speakers
AL

Annie Lockhart-Gilroy

Phillips Theological Seminary


Saturday November 2, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Algonquin A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

3:30pm

Break
Saturday November 2, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

3:45pm

Plenary 4: Presidential Address: Education for Coexistence: Pedagogies of the Sacred, of Difference, and of Hope
Hanan Alexander, Dean and Professor of Philosophy of Education in Faculty of Education at the University of Haifa and REA President-Elect, will offer a Presidential address on the conference theme with responses from HyeRan Kim-Cragg, Emmanuel College, University of Toronto, Canada, and Hosffman Ospino, Boston College, USA. Boyung Lee, currently a member of the REA Board, and incoming program chair for the 2020 meeting will moderate the session.


Moderators and Responders
avatar for HyeRan Kim-Cragg

HyeRan Kim-Cragg

Timothy Eaton Memorial Associate Professor of Preaching, Emmanuel College of Victoria University in the University of Toronto
HyeRan Kim-Cragg holds the Timothy Eaton Memorial Professorship in Preaching at Emmanuel College.  She comes to Emmanuel from St. Andrew's College (Saskatoon) where she held the Lydia Gruchy Chair of Pastoral Studies and, prior to that, she and her partner David served the United... Read More →
avatar for Boyung Lee

Boyung Lee

Academic Dean and Professor of Practical Theology, Iliff School of Theology
Rev. Dr. Lee joined Iliff as Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty on July 1, 2017. Her theological and scholarly pursuit is fueled by a commitment to social justice and works hard to embody her commitment in her leadership and pedagogical practices. She... Read More →
avatar for Hosffman Ospino

Hosffman Ospino

Associate Professor of Hispanic Ministry and Religious Education, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
Hosffman Ospino, PhD is an Associate Professor of Theology and Religious Education at Boston College, School of Theology and Ministry where he is also Director of Graduate Programs in Hispanic Ministry. He has conducted several national studies about Hispanic Catholicism. He has authored/edited... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hanan Alexander

Hanan Alexander

Dean of the Faculty of Education and Professor of Philosophy of Education, Program Chair and President-elect of REA, University of Haifa
Hanan Alexander is Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Haifa, where he serves as Professor of Philosophy of Education and chairs the executive board of the Center for Jewish Education. He has taught at American Jewish University, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Graduate Theological... Read More →


Saturday November 2, 2019 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

6:15pm

REA Business Meeting and Reception
Reception sponsored by the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.

Saturday November 2, 2019 6:15pm - 8:00pm
Trillium C Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00pm

Transnational/International Meet and Greet
If you identify as an International and/or Transnational Participant, come to our meet and greet on Friday at 8pm to meet others and have conversation. Light refreshments served.

Saturday November 2, 2019 8:00pm - 9:30pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00pm

Working Groups and Other Gatherings
Saturday November 2, 2019 8:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA
 
Sunday, November 3
 

7:30am

Catholic Liturgy (all welcome)
Moderators and Responders
avatar for Maureen O'Brien

Maureen O'Brien

Professor, Duquesne University

Speakers
avatar for Darren Dias

Darren Dias

Associate Professor of Theology, Research Fellow, Lonergan Research Institute (Toronto), University of St. MIchael's College in the University of Toronto


Sunday November 3, 2019 7:30am - 8:00am
Algonquin C/D Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

8:00am

Working Groups and Other Gatherings
Sunday November 3, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
TBA

9:00am

Plenary 5: Science and Religious Education in Divided Societies
One aspect of our current social divides involves a raging debate over the possibility of “post-truth,” “alternative facts,” and “fake news.” Among other issues, this debate revolves around the proper relation between empirical evidence, on the hand, and various political, cultural, and religious narratives, on the other. One way to consider this debate is by addressing relations between science and religion. Hence, the final plenary of the conference will feature the theme: “Science and Religious Education in Divided Societies.”

The panel of speakers for this session includes Michael Reiss, Anglican Priest and Professor of Science Education at University College, London, and President of the International Society for Science and Religion, and Sybrina Atwaters, Director: OMED Educational Services at the Georgia Institute of Technology. This session will feature an exercise for addressing tensions surrounding the teaching of evolution from Muslim, Jewish, Christian perspectives.


Moderators and Responders
avatar for Ari Y. Kelman

Ari Y. Kelman

Stanford Graduate School of Education
Professor Kelman's research focuses on the myriad ways in which people cultivate religious commitments. His research focuses on the ways that people learn religion across domains including schools, congregations, museums, camps, media, and online. He holds a particular research focus... Read More →

Speakers
AA

Anila Asghar

McGill University
avatar for Sybrina Atwaters

Sybrina Atwaters

Director, OMED: Educational Services, Georgia Tech Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion
Dr. Atwaters is the Chair of the Publications Committee of the REA Board.
avatar for Michael Reiss

Michael Reiss

Professor of Science Education, University College London
I am Professor of Science Education at UCL Institute of Education, University College London, Visiting Professor at the Universities of Kiel and York and the Royal Veterinary College, Honorary Fellow of the British Science Association and of the College of Teachers, Docent at the... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Pear

Rachel Pear

Research Fellow, University of Haifa
Rachel S. A. Pear is a research fellow at the University of Haifa's Center for Jewish and Democratic Education where she is the research coordinator of the first large scale study in Israel on evolution education and its relationship with religious views. Rachel received her BA from... Read More →


Sunday November 3, 2019 9:00am - 10:45am
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

10:45am

Break
Sunday November 3, 2019 10:45am - 11:00am
Trillium Foyer Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

11:00am

Interreligious Prayer and Closing
Sunday November 3, 2019 11:00am - 11:45am
Trillium A Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

12:00pm

REA Advisory Council with Box Lunch
Sunday November 3, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Cabinet Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale

1:30pm

REA Board Meeting
Sunday November 3, 2019 1:30pm - 3:30pm
MacDonald Room Holiday Inn, Toronto International Airport, 970 Dixon Road, Rexdale